Linguistics and Language Arts

Linguistics is the study of human languages, language theories, and language development patterns. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) linguistics is sub-specialty of anthropology. Linguistics not only study language, they study language as it relates to thought, behavior, culture, life and the development of societies.

Career opportunities for linguistic specialists can be found at colleges and universities, nonprofit organizations, government agencies, and other private and public organizations. Linguists also pursue opportunities with the CIA, FBI, as translators or intepreters, teachers, forensic analysts and counselors for children with communication disorders.

Degree programs in linguistics can be completed at the associate's, bachelor's, and graduate degree levels. Linguistic students will be required to complete courses in statistics, phonics, and general and computational linguistics. Most linguistic degrees offer students the opportunity to pursue a specialized track fo study. Linguist specializations include teaching, research, and developing languages, to name just a few. Entry-level jobs in linguistics and related fields can be obtained with a bachelor's degree, but, as is the case in most fields, those with master's degrees will have better job opportunities and enhanced earning potential. Aspiring university professors must earn a doctorate degree. Many colleges and universities are now offering linguistic degree programs that can be completed online.

Linguistics and Foreign Language Degree Programs

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